Border Collie

The Day After Tomorrow

In the 2004 film, “The Day After Tomorrow”, a homeless man named Luther (played by Glenn Plummer) always had his best friend by his side – a border collie named “Buddha”. Ian Doig was the animal trainer for this film.

The wolves in the movie were CGI but during shooting, real trained wolves were used and during post-production CGI animated wolves were inserted over the real wolves (presumably to make them look bigger and badder).

Millennium – Beware of the Dogs

The second episode of the second season of the TV show Millennium was “Beware of the Dogs” and featured a pack of “wild” dogs that seemed to be attacking people in a town. These “attack” dogs were nothing more than a pack of well trained Belgian malinois (ak.k.a Belgian shepherds).

Malinois (or “Mals” amongst the breed fanciers) are an extremely versatile breed. They are herding dogs, family companions, protectors, and hard working dogs. There aren’t many fields that a mal could not easily excel in with the right trainer. Their intelligence and loyalty to their “pack” (family) along with their primal and intense look make them the perfect breed for hard work including police and military work worldwide. Israel only uses malinois in their military and may police departments in the USA use many, if not all, malinois with their K9 units. Only the German shepherd can come close to competing with the malinois. Continue reading

Snow Dogs

In 2002 Cuba Gooding Jr starred in the Disney film, “Snow Dogs” who is a dentist in the warm climate of Miami who is thrust into Alaska upon hearing of his mother’s death. During this time, he inherits seven Siberian huskies and a border collie. Continue reading

The Vitagraph Dog

Jean, the Vitagraph DogJean, the Vitagraph Dog, was the first canine film star. Owned by Laurence Trimble (also owned Strongheart) where he ended up at the Vitagraph Studios to do a story for a local magazine on film making. His timing was perfect, he was there with his pet, Jean, when they needed a dog on the set to play opposite of Florence Turner

Jean became quite popular and was soon known as “the Vitagraph Dog”, starring in her own films along with “the Vitagraph Girl” all directed by Larry Trimble. One- and two-reelers with titles such as, Jean and the Calico Doll, Jean and the Waif, and Jean Goes Fishing were made by Trimble as their troupe filmed along the coastline in his native Maine.

Jean died in 1916.